genesis

The Bible Keeps its Promises – A Prophet Like Moses

A Prophet Like Moses

“When Israel was a child, I loved him,
And out of Egypt I called My son.” ~ Hosea 11:1

Deuteronomy 18:9-18

As we think about the baby born in the manger, it is helpful to remember that Jesus is not only a king like David; He is also a servant-leader like Moses. That’s why Moses told the Israelites that the Messiah would be “a prophet like me” (Deut. 18:15,18). Jesus is like Moses in many ways, going all the way back to what happened right after each was born. Moses was born into danger because the Egyptian Pharaoh had issued an order that all newborn Hebrew boys were to be thrown into the Nile river immediately. Moses’ mother hid him for his first three months, but when he grew too large to hide she put him in a basket and let him float among the reeds. Technically she had obeyed the law since she did put him in the river. As you may remember, baby Moses was rescued by the Pharaoh’s daughter and raised in the Egyptian palace (Ex. 2:1-10). He was protected by God at the very heart of Egyptian power. Jesus was also born into danger. King Herod tried to take his life because he feared Jesus might take away his throne. Funnily enough, under the guidance of heaven, Jesus’ parents also took Him to Egypt to keep Him safe. In so doing God fulfilled yet one more promise/prophecy: “Out of Egypt I called my son” (Hosea 11:1) Parting thought: Moses was a fierce warrior for God who never hesitated to judge his own people for their disobedience. Yet he just as quickly offered himself as a substitute sacrifice when God wanted to pour out His wrath upon the chosen people (Ex. 32:32). Both of Moses’ character traits are seen in Christ. For more than a millennium Moses’ life and witness testified to the way God intended to keep His Messianic promises.



The Bible Keeps Its Promises—The Christmas Star

The Christmas Star

“I see Him, but not now; I behold Him, but not near;
A Star shall come out of Jacob; A Scepter shall rise out of Israel,
And [a]batter the brow of Moab, And destroy all the sons of [b]tumult. ~ Num 24:17

Numbers 24:10-19

The Israelites were on the march from Egypt to the Promised Land. But to get there they had to go through Moab. As the children of Israel drew closer, the people of Moab became frightened. Eventually the Moabite king invited a popular seer (prophet) named Balaam to come and curse them, but Balaam discovered he could only speak words given him by God, which led him to utter blessings, not curses. Then, in the midst of blessing Israel, a surprising thing happened. God showed Balaam the future. He saw the birth of King David (Num. 24:17), a birth that was yet 400 years away. He also saw the birth of King Jesus, nearly 1,500 years away. It was Balaam who first connected a star with Jesus’ birth. This is God’s first reference to the heavenly light that would guide the Magi of Babylon all the way to Bethlehem. Like the “sceptre” in Gen. 49:10, this star refers to the Messiah’s kingship. This entire text in Numbers 24 is designed to say to the king of Moab, “If you think you’re are a great king, you haven’t seen anything until Jesus reigns!” Parting Thought: If you study today’s Scripture passage carefully you will see that it is difficult to decide which part speaks about David, and which part speaks of the Messiah. David was another of God’s reminders that someday a great king would come to rule the world.





The Bible Keeps Its Promises—The Messiah Is a Lion

The Messiah Is a Lion

Judah is a lion's whelp: from the prey, my son, thou art gone up: he stooped down, he couched as a lion, and as an old lion; who shall rouse him up? ~ Gen 49:9

Genesis 49:8-12

Abraham begat Isaac. Then Isaac begat two sons, Esau and Jacob. Ordinarily the older son would receive a larger inheritance, and for Abraham and his descendants no greater inheritance could be given than the privilege of being one of Jesus’ ancestors, a blessing that usually went to the first born. But God told Isaac that the Messianic bloodline would flow through Jacob, the younger of the two. Then Jacob had 12 sons, who fathered the 12 tribes of Israel. At the end of his life, Jacob gathered his sons to his bedside to give a blessing and pronounce a prophecy over each. In that moment Jacob revealed that his fourth son Judah would be next in the bloodline of the Messiah. In Jacob’s blessing of Judah, we learn that the baby born in Bethlehem was not only destined to be the lamb Who would die for the sins of the world. He would also be a lion, the King of Kings and Lord of Lords, who would rule over the nations with great strength and swift justice. As it says in Genesis 49:9, “Who dares to rouse him?” The Lamb of God died on the cross, but it was the Lion of Judah Who commanded His disciples to conquer the world by making disciples (Matthew 28:19-20). Parting Thought: Sometimes when a promise is made, we think we understand it, only to later realize that much more was intended. Who knew when God promised the woman’s seed would crush Satan’s head that He was talking about His only Son? (Rom. 1:5)